Another great day at the WRTI Performance Studio with three more winners of the 2018 Steinway Piano Competition: Emma Liu, Petrina Steimel and Max Wang with host Kevin Gordon. CLick WRTI’s link below and ENJOY!

Regional Winners of Steinway Competition for Young Pianists Live at WRTI: Part 2, July 11, 12:10 PM

 

Join us for the second of our special live concert broadcasts with the winners of the inaugural Steinway competition for young pianists on Wednesday, July 11 at 12:10 PM. You’ll hear Emma Liu (age 10), Petrina Steimel (age 12), and Max Wang (age 14). WRTI’s Kevin Gordon is host.

Watch the broadcast recorded live on the WRTI Facebook page.

The competition was held at Steinway showrooms across the United States and Canada. Here in Philadelphia, students from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Delaware and Maryland performed at Jacobs Music. Judging the competitors were Temple University’s Charles Abramovic, Immaculata University’s William Carr and Philadelphia Young Pianist Academy founder Ching-Yun Hu.

Emma Liu won third place in the first division. She has won several competitions for young players that took her  to the Kimmel Center and Carnegie Hall. Emma will play the Chopin Impromptu No. 1 in A-flat.

Petrina Steimel started playing the piano at the age of four. The 6th grader is homeschooled and also loves ballet, singing, and martial arts. Petrina will play The Cat and The Mouse by Aaron Copland.

Max Wang won 1st place in the second division and has been studying piano since he was 5 years old. Max also plays oboe in his school orchestra and will attend the Curtis Summerfest Young Artist Summer Program. Max will play Suite de Danzas Criollas, Op. 15 by Alberto Ginastera.

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2018 Steinway Piano Competition Winners performed LIVE today from the WRTI Performance Studio on WRTI’s Steinway Spirio piano!

Jacobs Music is proud to be the regional host in this inaugural year of the competition. which was open to young pianists from the United States and Canada.

Listen to performances by Alyssa Gabrilovich (age 12), Chris Jung (age 16), and Emma Lo (age 15) – three of the regional winners of the inaugural Steinway Competition for Young Pianists and all students of Igor Resnianski at the Nelly Berman School of Music. WRTI’s Kevin Gordon is host. The competition was held at Steinway showrooms across the United States and Canada. In Philadelphia, students from PA, NJ, NY, DE and MD performed at Jacobs Music in Philadelphia.

Watch the broadcast recorded live on the WRTI Facebook page.

More of the competition winners will be featured on WRTI on Wednesday, July 11 just after the noon news. Tune in to WRTI or stream it live on Facebook!

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Thank you WRTI for showcasing and supporting these talented young musicians!

Tune in to WRTI this Monday to hear three of the outstanding young pianists who were winners of the 2018 Steinway Piano Competition. All three study at the Nelly Berman School of Music with Igor Resnianski, who will appear with them on the broadcast. 

Jacobs Music is very pleased to share the following article from the WRTI website.

Young Steinway Competiton Winners Live from WRTI: Part 1, July 9 at 12:10 PM

  20 MINUTES AGO

Join us for a very special live concert broadcast, on Monday, July 9th, with the winners of the inaugural Steinway competition for young pianists. You’ll hear performances by Alyssa Gabrilovich (age 12), Chris Jung (age 16), and Emma Lo (age 15). WRTI’s Kevin Gordon is host.

Watch the broadcast live on the WRTI Facebook page.

The competition was held at Steinway showrooms across the United States and Canada. Here in Philadelphia, students from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Delaware and Maryland performed at Jacobs Music. Judging the competitors were Temple University’s Charles Abramovic, Immaculata University’s William Carr and Philadelphia Young Pianist Academy founder Ching-Yun Hu.

It’s an exciting program with three dynamic young pianists:

Pianist Emma Lo

Alyssa Gabrilovichhas been playing the piano for six years, and won second place for performers aged 10 through 13.  Alyssa will be playing the Five Bagatelles: IV and V Threnody (for all of the innocent victims) by Carl Vine.

Chris Jung is in the 10th grade and has been studying piano for six years. He’s the second-place winner for performers aged 14 through 16. Chris will play the 1st movement of Chopin’s Sonata No. 3.

Emma Lo won first place for the 14 through 16-year-old division. Emma will play Ondine from Maurice Ravel’s Gaspard de la Nuit.

All three of our young pianists are students of Steinway artist Igor Resnianski, who performed live in our WRTI studios earlier this year.

Listen to live performances by the stars of tomorrow on WRTI 90.1, online at WRTI.org, and live on the WRTI Facebook page on Monday July 9th at 12:10pm.

Join us for Part 2 on Wednesday, July 11 at 12:10 PM.

 

IT’S THE ONE-YEAR ANNIVERSARY OF KIDS ON KEYS!

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This Saturday, July 7, at 1:00 PM, we invite you to tune in to KIDS ON KEYS, produced and hosted by WWFM – The Classical Network and its Artist-in-Residence, Jed Distler.

Jacobs Music Company is very pleased and proud to mark the anniversary of this monthly show, sponsored by our company to showcase and support live performances by some of the best young piano talent in the area. Also featured on many of the broadcasts are historic recordings by future piano icons.

Kids on Keys celebrates its first anniversary this Saturday, July 7, at 1:00 p.m. with a program showcasing memorable performances presented over the past year by some of the best young piano talent in The Classical Network’s immediate broadcast area of Central and Southern New Jersey.

The pianists featured on this anniversary program include:

Joshua Baw
Alena Zhang
Iris Horng
Christopher Shin
Chris Jung
Anastasia Kudin
Lucy Zou

We hope you will tune in on Saturday and join in the Anniversary celebration but, as always, if you are unable to listen to Saturday’s radio broadcast on 89.1 FM or wish to hear past performances, you can also live-stream the program on the WWFM website.

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Steinway Artist, Robert Taub, on Beethoven, playing the piano, and building one’s own career…

We are pleased to share the following article which appeared in Centraljersey.com.

Pianist, Robert Taub of Princeton performs at Princeton University

  • Updated 

Globally acclaimed pianist Robert Taub performed last week as part of Princeton University’s 23rd annual International Conference on Plasma Surface Interactions in Controlled Fusion Devices.

The recital, which was held on June 19 saw an estimated crowd of 100 people gathered in the Richardson Auditorium on campus.

Taub, who is known for his performances of Beethoven’s compositions, played three of his piano sonatas and gave a short background into the life of the composer. Taub’s love for Beethoven has been a big part of his life, as the composer has been a big personal interest of his.

“My strong passion for Beethoven evolved over the course of many years,” Taub said. “When I was very young, all of my piano teachers had me learn one Beethoven piano sonata every year, so I got an early start. Then, when I was here [Princeton] as an undergraduate, I took a couple of courses with Lewis Lockwood, who is an eminent Beethoven scholar. He opened my eyes to exploring Beethoven’s creativity in a different realm. That forged an interest into understanding how Beethoven worked, so I gradually increased my repertoire to include all of the piano sonatas, and then all of the piano concertos and a lot of chamber music. It’s just such great literature and you keep coming back to it.”

Taub has been playing the piano all of his life. He doesn’t actually remember the act of starting to play; so for him, it was something he always had done.

“I was told that I was 3 and my conscious memory doesn’t go back before that,” he said. “So, as far as I’m aware, I have always been playing the piano one way or another. I do remember when I was very young, my parents took me to a Steinway retail showroom. I remember reaching up to the base notes of the piano and being enthralled with the full sound. I have a vague memory of the piano being delivered to my parents’ house, but I don’t remember actually starting; so it’s something I’ve always done.”

Taub’s love for Steinway pianos followed him throughout his life. He  even used a Steinway piano during his performance at Princeton.

“I have a very good relationship with Steinway,” he said. “I love their pianos. I am, like many other people are, a Steinway artist, which means that I play Steinway pianos, and they provide the instruments and a very valuable service, which is to be able to rehearse worldwide at any of their Steinway representatives.”

During his time at Princeton, Taub created a book, “Playing the Beethoven Piano Sonatas,” which has become the standard for Beethoven literature around the world.

“The first time that I played the Beethoven sonatas as a group, as a cycle, was actually in Princeton,” he said. “To play the cycle of some 32 sonatas for a pianist is a little bit like climbing Mt. Everest. It’s a goal. It’s an extremely rewarding goal. I enjoyed playing the concerts and I gave pre-concert talks, and I also wrote extensive program notes. I remember writing some program notes and rereading the draft and thinking that I would actually like to express more detail into them. I realized there was no book that was written on the piano sonatas that was written from the pianist perspective. There had been many good books written from the musicological perspective, but no pianist has taken the time or made the effort to write what it’s like to actually live with these works and play them.”

During Taub’s time as an undergraduate student at Princeton, he took all of the prerequired courses, without realizing it, to apply to schools for a pre-medical education.

After applying and getting into a number of colleges for med school, and also having gotten into Juilliard for graduate work, Taub was faced with a very important decision.

“Doctor or musician,” he said. “I imagined two scenarios. One was, 10 years after making such a decision: I imaged being a doctor, and going with a friend to a performance at Carnegie Hall and saying to him, ‘You know, I could have been a pianist.’ Then, I imagined the inverse of the situation, and saying, ‘You know, I could have been a doctor.’ Which one of those scenarios could I have lived with? Well, the answer was obvious.”

But after making the decision to go to Juilliard for graduate studies in music, Taub soon realized that making a career path for himself wasn’t going to be the easiest thing to do.

“I realized early on that I had to create my own pathways, my own niche. I had to do what I wanted to do and build my own career,” he said. “So, I looked at ways of building my own career. I won some smaller competitions; I met some people; I made a couple of recordings. But then, I had an opportunity to apply for the Peabody Mason Award and it looked extremely attractive.”

The Peabody Mason International Piano Competition was inspired by Peabody Mason’s commitment to the arts and serves to showcase upcoming piano talent. The competition was first held in 1981 and only has had four grand prize winners. The grand prize winners receive a stipend of living expenses for two years, as well as a recital of their own in New York and Boston.

The sole requirement to apply for the competition was to be between the ages of 25 and 35. Taub turned 25, six days before the application deadline and was eligible.

“There were guys there that were 34 and 35, and I was the youngest by nine years,” he said. “I thought that I had no hope, but I just went up there and played and had a good time playing, and they ended up choosing me as the winner.”

Taub was the first person to win the Peabody Mason Award in 1981 and only one of four people to win the grand prize since.

“Now I had the resources, courtesy of the award, to be able to study more, learn more,” he said. “The luxury of time, to think about music and to build my repertoire in an encompassing manner. At the end of that two-year stipend period, I launched recitals in the Lincoln Center and the equivalent in Boston, and that helped enormously for my career. That was great.”

Since then, Taub has performed globally. Taub has performed as a guest soloist with the world’s leading orchestras. Based in Princeton for more than 25 years, Taub and his wife are now moving to England, where he will be building a concert series and festival for Peninsula Arts at the University of Plymouth.

Children learning to play the piano leads to more than just beautiful music alone… We are pleased to share the following article published in Time Magazine.

Susanne Alfredsson / EyeEm—Getty Images/EyeEm

By JAMIE DUCHARME

July 1, 2018
TIME Health
For more, visit TIME Health.

With 88 keys and hundreds of internal strings, a standard piano produces a slew of unique sounds and tones. And mastering that complex system doesn’t only result in beautiful music — a new study says it can also help kids build up their language skills.

“There’s evidence that early exposure to piano practice enhances the processing of sounds that extend not only from music, but also into language,” says John Gabrieli, a cognitive neuroscientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s McGovern Institute for Brain Research, and the co-author of the paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Building on an existing body of research on music and childhood development, the authors pinpoint a specific way that piano lessons can help young children enhance their language processing skills. As kids’ ears become trained to distinguish between different pitches and tones at the piano, Gabrieli explains, they also seem to get better at parsing subtle differences between spoken words, a key element of language acquisition.

For the study, researchers sorted 74 Mandarin-speaking Chinese kindergarteners, all of whom were either 4 or 5 years old, into three groups. One group took three 45-minute piano lessons each week, one group got the same amount of additional reading instruction, and the final group did neither.

After six months, the groups showed no significant differences in general measures of cognitive ability — things like IQ, memory and attention span — but the piano group had distinguished itself in one key way.

Even compared to their peers in the extra reading group, children who took piano lessons were significantly better at distinguishing between spoken words that differed by only one consonant, Gabrieli explains. (Both the piano and reading groups performed better than the control group at differentiating between vowels.) This, he says, suggests that piano lessons affect a crucial and complex element of language processing.

Consonants, like “T” and “D”, can sound so similar that the human brain has to make a snap decision about what it’s hearing. “Consonants require a bit more precision to tell one from another than do vowels,” Gabrieli says. “The biggest benefit showed up where there’s the biggest challenge.”

This effect is “especially salient” for Mandarin speakers, Gabrieli says, because the oral language relies so heavily on subtle differences in tone. But he says other research has suggested that musical ability may offer similar benefits to speakers of non-tonal languages, such as English. While the current study looked specifically at piano lessons, Gabrieli says the findings “might well extend broadly to other musical education” as well.

The results were so striking that the school in Beijing where the study was performed continued to offer piano lessons to its young students even after the experiment ended. “The more advanced they are, the better they progress on [pitch discrimination], and it helps them with language development altogether,” Gabrieli says.

If you missed hearing KIDS ON KEYS last Saturday, June 2nd, you can still hear these great performances on the WWFM website…

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WWFM Kids on Keys host Jed Distler
WWFM Kids on Keys host Jed Distler

Jacobs Music Company is proud to sponsor this monthly show, hosted by WWFM – The Classical Network and its Artist-in-Residence, Jed Distler, which showcases live performances with some of the best young piano talent in the area. Also featured on the June 2nd  broadcast are historic recordings by future piano icon:

Robert Schumann: In Memoriam November 4th 1847 (date of Felix Mendelssohn’s death) –  Performed by Zahavi Rodriguez

Tom Gerou: The Peacocks of Babylon – Performed by Nathalie Yeh

Frederic Chopin: Etude in B Minor Op. 25 No. 10 – Performed by Max Wang

Claude Debussy: L’isle Joyeuse – Performed by Elizabeth Yang

Igor Stravinsky: The Firebird (excerpts) – Performed by Hsi-Yun Wu

The show also includes recordings by Daniel Barenboim and Maurizio Pollini as teenagers, plus a 16-year-old Welsh pianist Elias Ackerly playing Liszt, from a private live recording.

Tune in to the WWFM website and ENJOY!

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Did you know that the primary reason pianos go out of tune is seasonal changes in the humidity?

While humidity fluctuations primarily affect the tuning they also impact every other wooden part of the piano, just more subtly.   This is why all manufacturers recommend 2 to 4 services per year on your piano.

To help you save money and to keep your piano in good working condition, Jacobs Music is offering a Preferred Customer Pricing Plan that allows you to pay ahead for your piano tunings and save!

Don’t forget to ask about cleaning, regulating, voicing or any other long-term service regarding the care of your piano.

To schedule your tuning, cleaning, regulation or other service please contact the Jacobs Music Service Department at 215-659-5423, email service@jacobsmusiccompany.com, or visit us online at jacobsmusic.com.

Request an appointment online at Jacobsmusic.com/tuning.php .

We understand that life is busy.   Feel free to use our online appointment request service.

Click here to request an appointment

Thank you for choosing Jacobs Music to service your piano.   We look forward to hearing from you!

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This Saturday, May 5, at 1:00 PM, we invite you to tune in to KIDS ON KEYS, hosted by WWFM – The Classical Network and its Artist-in-Residence, Jed Distler.

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Jacobs Music Company is proud to sponsor this monthly show, which showcases live performances with some of the best young piano talent in the area. Also featured on many of the broadcasts are historic recordings by future piano icons.

THIS WEEK’S PROGRAM PRESENTS:

Schumann Arabeske, performed by KIKO YOSHIHIRA

Mozart Duport Variations, performed by JUN SHIMADA

Debussy Prelude, performed by SARAH LI

Rachmaninov Two Preludes, ALEXIS WEISSENBERG performing (he’s this week’s famous pianist, heard in teenage recordings!)

Robert Argasinski, Fantasy on Love, ROBERT ARGASINSKI performing

Lushtak, Old and New, performed by CHRIS JUNG

Chopin, Scherzo No. 1, performed by CHRISTOPHER SHIN

If you are unable to listen to Saturday’s radio broadcast on 89.1 FM or wish to hear past performances, you can also live-stream the program on the WWFM website.

ENJOY!

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We have been enjoying a very musical Spring at Jacobs Music of Ephrata!

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In March, we were pleased to host a wonderful recital by Jocelyn Swigger and Michael Jorgensen in the Buch Organ Company showroom adjoining our Ephrata location. As an additional and unique treat, Dr. Swigger performed on Van Cliburn’s Steinway piano. Repertoire for violin and piano included works by Brahms, Copland and Miklos Rozsa.

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We enjoyed a beautiful Senior Recital on April 15th. Graduating pianists Billy Quinn and Joel Gingrich performed for a very appreciative audience.

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Last week, Laura Zaruta from the Roland Corporation led a workshop for music educators, sponsored by the Lancaster Music Teachers Association,  on the subject: “How Do You Keep The Music Playing?” The group explored ways to partner tradition with technology to inspire creativity, accelerate progress, and enhance students’ desire to make music.

 

Laura Zaruta, Roland Corporation, leading workshop for Music Teachers at Jacobs Music of Ephrata

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We hope that many of you will join us at future musical events in Ephrata and at all of our Jacobs Music locations! Follow us on Facebook for updates and information on things to come.